Skip to main content
Need assistance getting a cannabis business license? We can help. Schedule a Free Consultation
Need assistance getting a cannabis business license?  Schedule a Free Consultation
image

It’s been almost three years since state lawmakers approved medical marijuana sales. The industry is still struggling to get off the ground.Alabama Always invested millions in their integrated Montgomery company because a requirement to get a license from the Alabama Medical Cannabis Commission was that you had to be ready to operate within 60 days. They were not awarded a license. Now, they want to the court to force the commission to reveal details on how it chose winners and losers.Attorney for Alabama Always, Will Somerville, said, “I think they’re afraid that we’ll find out what their secrets are. And as I’ve made clear many times, we believe that public business ought to be conducted in public.”Vince Schillieci is part owner and the attorney for CSS of Alabama. That company was awarded a dispensary license, but it has yet to be issued that license because the courts granted a temporary stay in the issuance.He said, “To say that it wasn’t a transparent process, I think, may be disingenuous. Every one of us are filmed on YouTube. You can go see my presentation; you can see every applicant’s presentation.”Schilleci says the lawsuits are a case of sour grapes.Somerville disagrees.“The only thing that’s really slowing things down is the commission’s refusal to abide by the statutory requirements. If they had abided by those requirements, like the 60-day cultivation requirement, we would have been cultivating cannabis by now,” Somerville said.Schillieci said, “The only time people file lawsuits is when they don’t win. And the real tragedy of all this is a few disappointed applicants are standing in the way of patients that need this medicine today.”The courts seem to realize the urgency of these lawsuits and are expediting many of the cases. Schilleci says if they can get the temporary hold on issuing the licenses lifted, they can move forward with getting the industry off the ground while the lawsuits are decided in court.

It’s been almost three years since state lawmakers approved medical marijuana sales. The industry is still struggling to get off the ground.

Alabama Always invested millions in their integrated Montgomery company because a requirement to get a license from the Alabama Medical Cannabis Commission was that you had to be ready to operate within 60 days. They were not awarded a license. Now, they want to the court to force the commission to reveal details on how it chose winners and losers.

Advertisement

Attorney for Alabama Always, Will Somerville, said, “I think they’re afraid that we’ll find out what their secrets are. And as I’ve made clear many times, we believe that public business ought to be conducted in public.”

Vince Schillieci is part owner and the attorney for CSS of Alabama. That company was awarded a dispensary license, but it has yet to be issued that license because the courts granted a temporary stay in the issuance.

He said, “To say that it wasn’t a transparent process, I think, may be disingenuous. Every one of us are filmed on YouTube. You can go see my presentation; you can see every applicant’s presentation.”

Schilleci says the lawsuits are a case of sour grapes.

Somerville disagrees.

“The only thing that’s really slowing things down is the commission’s refusal to abide by the statutory requirements. If they had abided by those requirements, like the 60-day cultivation requirement, we would have been cultivating cannabis by now,” Somerville said.

Schillieci said, “The only time people file lawsuits is when they don’t win. And the real tragedy of all this is a few disappointed applicants are standing in the way of patients that need this medicine today.”

The courts seem to realize the urgency of these lawsuits and are expediting many of the cases. Schilleci says if they can get the temporary hold on issuing the licenses lifted, they can move forward with getting the industry off the ground while the lawsuits are decided in court.

Request a Free Consultation